Movement in Company

Form drawing

In form drawing, we trace linear and curved forms by hand on big sheets of paper in a rhythmic pattern. The activity, in which we move from simple to more complex drawings, serves to improve our eye-hand coordination, fine motor skills and flexibility of thought.
With form drawing, we connect with a rhythm, a pulse of life that engages our entire body and being. The movement and the essence of these different forms not only penetrate our thoughts but also our entire being. Simultaneously, at a subconscious level, this provides an architecture, a type of inner gymnastics and alignment, that strengthens us and helps us to find our balance. We are then more sensitized to recognizing and appreciating the forms we find in nature. For example, we more readily identify the spiral of a shell, the growth of a pine cone, the five-pointed star of a flower or a starfish, and the hexagon of snowflakes. Our interest in the world is nurtured and stimulated.
What is form drawing?
Benefits
Form drawing:
  • improves concentration;
  • develops eye–hand coordination and fine motor skills;
  • improves handwriting—by developing skills for forming individual letters, holding a pencil and finding a directional flow when writing;
  • improves breathing;
  • relieves bodily tensions, stress, cramps, asthma, etc.;
  • develops flexibility and fluidity in the wrist;
  • promotes creative and flexible thinking;
  • nurtures a sense of wonder and awe through the exploration of the visual aspects of archetypal forms of nature such as the spiral, the square and the lemniscate;
  • is beneficial for participants with dyslexia or other learning disabilities.
The tradition of form drawing goes back to Antiquity, when Ars Lineandi (“art of the line”) was promulgated by the Athenian philosopher Proclus (412–485 AD). At the turn of the 20th century, this art was rediscovered and developed by the philosopher and pedagogue Rudolf Steiner, founder of Waldorf education. The form drawing classes of Movement in Company are based on this tradition of promoting the expression and flow of body movement.
History
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